Tuesday, April 29, 2008

The Making of Handmade Mee Sua....

My mee sua neatly rolled up in small batches to be dry under hot sun........


Recently, while browsing through Lilian's blog on Penang Food about the Hock Chiew Ang Chiew Mee Sua (mee sua in red wine).....it reminds me of my intention of posting up some pictures of how the traditional way of handmade mee sua are produced back in my hometown.

Mee Sua is a type of thin salted chinese noodles made from wheat flour which is made by a special method and skills in pulling the noodles to a very thin threadlike strands and then it is dry out in the hot sun. Mee Sua can be cook in many ways according to the different chinese ethnic cultures and you can see mee sua dishes at important chinese festivals and birthdays because to the Chinese it signifies long life...(the strands will be as long as 2 to 3 meters in length)..here are some pics of the production of the mee sua in my hometown....courtesy of a friend.

First the wet dough or paste made from a mixture of wheat flour, water and salt are rolled circularly in a pail.

Then, the rolled strands of dough were woven in between two bamboo sticks in a bow pattern.

It is then left to ferment hanging in a special box for a few hours.....

The sticks of fermented mee sua are then push into holes in specially made poles in an open space outside the house.

The noodles are then pulled skilfuly to a long thin strands without breaking them.....and then push into holes on the other end of the poles to be left to dry under the sun......


The sun dried mee sua are then folded up and are ready to be sold in rolls or for distribution to sundry shops. The ones we bought from sundry shops are not really very dry and it had to be dry out in the hot sun again if the mee sua is to be kept in tins for a period of time (2 to 3 months)or else a damp mee sua will not keep for long.

There are some mee suas in shops which are made by machines and oven dried which do not really tastes as soft and as nice as the handmade ones. There are two versions of these handmade mee sua.....one is thinner and the other is the thicker version which is taken from the lower part of the pulled mee sua and the price is much cheaper too.

I have a recipe of this lovely mee sua cook in 'ang chiew' (rice wine) in my blog here.

14 comments:

Little Corner of Mine said...

Man, making mee sua is really hardwork!

Big Boys Oven said...

OMG! this is so awesome. A treasure that still obtainable!

beachlover said...

Thanks for showing us how this woman make mee sua.I have no knowledge that they use real hand work,I thought it's machine make!!

CK Lam said...

Very informative photos..tks for sharing.

what2see

noobcook said...

This is sooo informative! Love the photos! I really appreciate the hard work that goes into making hand-made mee sua!

Sweet Jasmine said...

little corner of mine - yeah..this is back breaking work plus skills too.....

Sweet Jasmine said...

big boys oven - you do not find many young people picking up such skills any more...hope we will still get our handmade mee sua for many years to come...

Sweet Jasmine said...

beachlovers - you do get machine made ones in big towns...you will only see these man made ones in small villages or towns......

Sweet Jasmine said...

ck lam - its my pleasure to share something unique for my readers...thks for dropping by...

Sweet Jasmine said...

noobcook - now you know why handmade mee sua taste so special...a skill handed down from older generations....hope it will be pass down to the younger generations.....

Anonymous said...

WOW!! This was amazing! I hope I get to taste the handmade stuff one of these days. Thx for sharing.

Sweet Jasmine said...

anonymous - oh..you should try these handmade mee sua....can get them from sundry shops in Sitiawan and Ayer Tawar, Perak....

gay said...

Hi! We call them misua here in the Philippines. I haven't really had the chance to cook them yet. Look forward to your recipes...

Kok said...

sweetjasmine,
I didn't know handmade mee sua is made that way. hehe.